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04:23
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01:17
Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 1. Bookbinding and Decoration
06:48
유네스코한국위원회 - KNCU

Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 1. Bookbinding and Decoration

#YWSFoundation Have you heard about “Uigwe”? Have you seen the Korean ancient books filled with colorful description of colorful parade and vivid expressions of people? Korea has a rich history of books and printing, stretching back centuries. The surviving treasures of this documentary history include the Uigwe (Royal Protocols of the Joseon Dynasty), a collection of thousands of books recording royal ceremonies and rituals held during Korea’s Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). These books contain pictures and stories that vividly bring to life Korea’s ancient Confucian society, offering details that might otherwise be forgotten. The Uigwe were inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register in 2007, in recognition of their world cultural significance, uniqueness and irreplaceability as documentary heritage. Under the auspices of the Yang Won Sun Foundation, the Korean National Commission for UNESCO (KNCU) has created three short videos to introduce the Uigwe, focusing on three representative features that show the significance of these books both as tangible objects, and in illuminating many aspects of Joseon Korea’s Confucian culture, including ancestor worship and archery. Series 1. The Uigwe as Objects - Binding and Decoration The Joseon Dynasty is well known for its advanced printing and publishing, and the Uigwe are an excellent example. In particular, the special techniques used to make the editions of the Uigwe intended for use by the Joseon kings resulted in exquisite, richly decorated books, so beautiful that many were stolen as treasure by a French expeditionary force in 1866. If you want to see other series, please click on the following link - Series 2 (People in the Uigwe) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y96iZVv9ADw - Series 3 (Events in the Uigwe) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhPWEa9iM30 (* Please note that the images of Uigwe in the video may differ from the actual images. They are created for explaining and showing a sample of Uigwe.) Produced by Do Project Advisor : Dr. Gye Young Cho (Kyujanggak Institute for Korean Studies, Seoul National University) Korean Editor : Mr. Boram Kim (Editor-in-Chief, UNESCO News for KNCU) English Translator : Ms. Sarah Jane Kim (Communication Specialist, KNCU) 00:00 Intro 00:27 What are the Uigwe? 01:22 The value of the Uigwe 02:18 The special significance contained in the material characteristics of the Uigwe 03:32 The essence of Joseon book-making as seen through the Uigwe 05:36 The ethos of archival culture transmitted through its material properties
Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 3. Events in the Uigwe
10:38
유네스코한국위원회 - KNCU

Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 3. Events in the Uigwe

#YWSFoundation Have you heard about “Uigwe”? Have you seen the Korean ancient books filled with colorful description of colorful parade and vivid expressions of people? Korea has a rich history of books and printing, stretching back centuries. The surviving treasures of this documentary history include the Uigwe (Royal Protocols of the Joseon Dynasty), a collection of thousands of books recording royal ceremonies and rituals held during Korea’s Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). These books contain pictures and stories that vividly bring to life Korea’s ancient Confucian society, offering details that might otherwise be forgotten. The Uigwe were inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register in 2007, in recognition of their world cultural significance, uniqueness and irreplaceability as documentary heritage. Under the auspices of the Yang Won Sun Foundation, the Korean National Commission for UNESCO (KNCU) has created three short videos to introduce the Uigwe, focusing on three representative features that show the significance of these books both as tangible objects, and in illuminating many aspects of Joseon Korea’s Confucian culture, including ancestor worship and archery. Series 3. Events in the Uigwe – Confucian Archery Ceremonies seen through the Daesarye Uigwe Koreans have long been known for their skill in archery. But in ancient Korea, archery was not simply a skill, but a tool to teach and practice virtue, especially during the Joseon Dynasty, when Confucianism held sway. The Daesarye Uigwe includes an interesting story of an archery contest hosted by King Yeongjo in the 18th century, a joyful event symbolically marking a revival in Korea’s fortunes after a period of invasion and turmoil. If you want to see other series, please click on the following link - Series 1 (The Uigwe as objects) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyacNZZdfMQ&t=43s - Series 2 (People in the Uigwe) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y96iZVv9ADw (* Please note that the images of Uigwe in the video may differ from the actual images. They are created for explaining and showing a sample of Uigwe.) Produced by Do Project Advisor : Dr. Moonshik Kang (Department of History, Soongsil University) Korean Editor : Mr. Boram Kim (Editor-in-Chief, UNESCO News for KNCU) English Translator : Ms. Sarah Jane Kim (Communication Specialist, KNCU) 00:00 Intro 00:26 The Art of Archery and its Significance 01:27 The Joseon Daesarye Uigwe 03:33 The King Shoots 05:57 The courtiers’ turn to shoot and the joyful end to the event 04:02 Serving a role between the sacred and the profane 05:17 The daily lives of Jongmyo’s Subok, laid before our eyes once more
Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 2. People in the Uigwe
07:41
유네스코한국위원회 - KNCU

Uigwe (Royal Protocol of Joseon Dynasty) - 2. People in the Uigwe

#YWSFoundation Have you heard about “Uigwe”? Have you seen the Korean ancient books filled with colorful description of colorful parade and vivid expressions of people? Korea has a rich history of books and printing, stretching back centuries. The surviving treasures of this documentary history include the Uigwe (Royal Protocols of the Joseon Dynasty), a collection of thousands of books recording royal ceremonies and rituals held during Korea’s Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). These books contain pictures and stories that vividly bring to life Korea’s ancient Confucian society, offering details that might otherwise be forgotten. The Uigwe were inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World International Register in 2007, in recognition of their world cultural significance, uniqueness and irreplaceability as documentary heritage. Under the auspices of the Yang Won Sun Foundation, the Korean National Commission for UNESCO (KNCU) has created three short videos to introduce the Uigwe, focusing on three representative features that show the significance of these books both as tangible objects, and in illuminating many aspects of Joseon Korea’s Confucian culture, including ancestor worship and archery. Series 2. People in the Uigwe - the Work of the Subok Shrine Attendants in the Jongmyo Uigwe Jongmyo Shrine, dedicated to memorial services and rituals concerning the deceased kings and queens of the Joseon Dynasty, was one of Joseon Korea’s most sacred spaces and was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1995. The series of special ceremonies conducted at the shrine to pray to these royal ancestors for the preservation of the Joseon state was also among the first items of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity designated by UNESCO in 2001. The shrine’s royal rituals were vitally important in Joseon Korea, but the low-status shrine attendants who toiled for the preparation of the rites at the shrine have been almost forgotten. The pictures and records in the Jongmyo Uigwe bring these people, called the Subok, back to life in vivid detail. If you want to see other series, please click on the following link - Series 1 (The Uigwe as objects) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyacNZZdfMQ&t=43s - Series 3 (Events in the Uigwe) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhPWEa9iM30 (* Please note that the images of Uigwe in the video may differ from the actual images. They are created for explaining and showing a sample of Uigwe.) Produced by Do Project Advisor : Dr. Wook Lee (The Academy of Korean Studies) Korean Editor : Mr. Boram Kim (Editor-in-Chief, UNESCO News for KNCU) English Translator : Ms. Sarah Jane Kim (Communication Specialist, KNCU) 00:00 Intro 00:25 Who were the Subok? 01:27 Shedding light on the veiled existence of the Subok 02:27 The Jongmyo Uigwe manuals and history books 03:05 The role of the Subok, rediscovered through the Uigwe 04:02 Serving a role between the sacred and the profane 05:17 The daily lives of Jongmyo’s Subok, laid before our eyes once more
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